KIDS: TIC Polk Elementary School Egg Day Photos

TIC Polk Elementary School Egg Day Photos

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Trout in the Classroom
 
 
Polk Elementary School - Egg Delivery Day
 
November 17, 2010
 
 
 
 
Trout Unlimited members Al Concilio and Dom Falcone meet with other TIC coordinators from the other TU Chapters in the commuter parking lot off Rout 691 in Cheshire. They wait for the Department of Environmental Protection technician to deliver the fertilized brown trout eggs for all of the TIC installations in Connecticut.
 
After the eggs are distributed, the TIC coordinators have only a short time to get to their schools and place the eggs in the egg baskets installed in each tank. Before the eggs are placed in the egg basket, the water in the egg containers must be brought to the same temperature as the water in the tanks. Do you know why? Answer
 
Before the eggs are placed in the egg basket, each student gets to see the eggs and guess what the small black specks are in each egg. Do you know what they are? Answer
 
Students then place the eggs in the egg basket, and each student gets to take a look at them. After everyone has had a look, Al and Dom go over the duties the students will have once the eggs hatch, which should be in late December. While the TU coordinators will make periodic visits to check on progress, and will be available in case of emergencies, Trout in the Classroom is a student project, and they will be responsible for the care and feeding of the trout from eggs to fingerlings.
 
Daily and weekly duties for the students include the following:
 
1. Check for white eggs daily. Do you know why? Answer
 
2. Testing the water ph and ammonia levels weekly. Do you know what ph means? Answer
 
3. Monitor the water temperature daily.
 
4. Adding stresszyme weekly if necessary
 
5. Doing water changes if necessary
 
 
Delivery Day Photos
 
{Picture of Trout Unlimited members Waiting in Parking lot for DEP Truck}
Trout in the Classroom Coordinators meet in a Cheshire commuter lot to get the eggs for their schools
 
  
{The Eggs Arrive From the Department of Enviromental Protection}
The egg containers are delivered by the Department of Environmental Protection in a cooler packed with ice
 
{Picture of TU Members with Egg Containers}
The DEP Technician distributes the egg containers to each of the TIC Coordinators, one for each school
 
{Picture of the Polk Elementary School Tank Ready for the Eggs}
The tank at Polk Elementary School has been decorated by the students, and is waiting for the brown trout eggs to be delivered
 
{Picture of the TIC Coordinators Delivering the Eggs and Explaining what the Students must do}
TIC Coordinators Dom Falcone and Al Concillio arrive with the eggs and explain the process of placing the eggs in the tank to the students
 
{Picture of Trout Eggs in the Container}
Dom Falcone shows the container of trout eggs to each of the students. Do you see the little black specks in each egg? Do you know what they are? Answer
 
{Picture of Coordinator Don Falcone Showing the Eggs to the Students}
Everyone gets to look at the eggs in the container
 
{Picture of a Student Checking the Temperature of the Water in the Egg Container}
A student checks the temperature of the water in the egg container
 
{Picture of the Students Listening to the Coordinators Explain the Process of Putting the Eggs int he Tank}
The students listen as Al and Dom talk about the process of putting the eggs in the tank and answer questions
 
{Picture of Coordinator Al Concillio Explaining how the Trout will be Fed when they Hatch}
Al Concillio shows the students the bags of food that they will feed the trout once they hatch. There are three bags of food - 0 (beginning food), 1 (second level), and 2 (final level before release). Al cautions the students that they should feed only small amounts of food. Do you know why? Answer
 
{Picture of a Student Placing the Eggs in the Egg Basket}
One student is selected to place the eggs in the egg basket while Mrs. Sarandrea and Classroom Aide Sue Petrok take pictures
 
{Picture of Trout Eggs in the Egg Basket}
The trout eggs are now in the egg basket where they will stay until they hatch around the end of December
 
 
{Picture of a Student Looking at the Trout Eggs in the Egg Basket}
The students take turns coming up to look at the eggs in the egg basket
 
 
{Picture of a Student Looking at the Trout Eggs in the Egg Basket}
Students checking out the eggs in the egg basket
 
{Picture of Student looking at the Trout Eggs in the Egg Basket}
Another student looking at the eggs in the egg basket
 
{Picture of Student looking at the Trout Eggs in the Egg Basket}
Another picture of students lined up to see the eggs in the egg basket
 
{Picture of Student looking at the Trout Eggs in the Egg Basket}
Last picture of students lined up to look at the eggs in the egg basket
 
 
 
 
 
All of the pictures above and more may be downloaded in the following file ( .Zip file 55 mB)
 
 
 
The next step in this process will be when the eggs begin to hatch. When will the eggs hatch? Well, by experience we know that it will probably be sometime around the end of December, but the actual time is controlled by the temperature of the water in the tank. Using a system called Accumulated Thermal Units, you can determine, with close accuracy, when the eggs will hatch and the trout will emerge. You can find information on Accumulated Thermal Units at http://www.sf.adfg.state.ak.us/education/index.cfm/FA/sic.ATUBackground    
 
 
Answers to Questions:
 
The temperature of the water in the container and the temperature of the water tank must be approximately the same or the fragile eggs could be shocked and die. The temperatures are balanced by letting the container float in the tank until balance is achieved. 
 
 
If there is too much food in the tank, the uneaten food will decay and breed harmful bacteria in the water.
 
An egg that has turned all white will mean that the egg has died and must be removed. If the egg were not removed, it could encourage the growth of bacteria that could kill the rest of the eggs.
 
ph is a measure of the acid or alkaline content of a liquid on a scale of 0-14, with 7.0 being the neutral measure of pure distilled water. http://www.elmhurst.edu/~chm/vchembook/184ph.html
 
 
Images and descriptions on this page may be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. All other uses are prohibited under United State copyright laws without the written permission of ConneCT Kids. For information, contact ConneCT Kids at connect.kids@ct.gov
 
 
 
 
 
 




Content Last Modified on 2/8/2011 12:54:49 PM